Our Marina Zea cruising itinerary will guide you through some of the most picturesque scenery in Greece. You will be surrounded by beautiful bays and coves across the Saronic Gulf, and neighbouring islands filled with quiet villages, historic sites and scenic beaches that make this cruising ground so unique. A typical Marina Zea itinerary can include the protected waters of the Saronic Gulf between the Attica and Peloponnesian peninsulas. Popular stops include the islands of Kea, Hydra, Poros and Kithnos, to name just a few. Each destination has a pleasing host of rewarding attractions that are certainly worth experiencing: snorkelling, swimming, and sunbathing on pristine beaches; sightseeing tours of ancient temples and medieval castles; exploring traditional open-air markets and dining in intimate tavernas.

Day 1

Poros

Approaching the town, you’ll sail through a narrow, picturesque channel that separates the island of Poros from the Peloponnese peninsula. Pine, olive and lemon trees blanket the hillsides and reach the sandy beaches. You’ll see a mountainous green landscape overlooking the red-topped roofs that line the streets of Poros Town. A host of cafes, bars and souvenir shops line the docks of Poros Town, but the best are located around the town square near the museum and town hall.

Majestic vistas await from the top of the island’s pine-forested interior. Consider hiring a scooter to further explore this area. At the top of the island’s highest hill, you’ll find the historic clock of Poros, a trademark of the island that is visible from everywhere. For a more historical adventure, visit Moni Zoodochou Pigis, an 18th century monastery built around the island’s only spring.

If you’re up for a good party, the most famous nightclub on the island is Poseidon, which is located on a hillside overlooking the town. The party starts at 1 p.m. and continues until the wee morning hours.

Day 2

Hydra

Hydra is a distinctively charming “must do” itinerary stop. The welcoming culture, architecture and beautifully tranquil sea-side setting of Hydra have long been an attraction to travelers seeking unique experiences off the beaten path. Here, donkeys and walking are the primary means of transportation – cars and even bicycles are not permitted! Hydra is a place where you will truly slip into the relaxing Mediterranean way of life. The town has a reputation for serving superior Grecian cuisine; pictorial beaches perfect for swimming, snorkeling and sunbathing; and the intriguing history. Here you’ll see elegant mansions of a bygone era, historic monasteries and museums.

Day 3

Kithnos Island

Located southeast of Kea and northwest of Serifos, Kithnos (also spelled Kythnos) is typical of the acrid, rugged islands found throughout the Aegean Sea. Its brown-colored hills extend just over 1,000 feet in height. Along the coast are numerous coves and bays, some of them quite beautiful with nearby sandy beaches. Exploring the indented shores aboard your graceful yacht marks a highpoint of Kithnos sailing. The ambience at the port towns and inland villages is laid-back, far removed from the bustle found on islands that are prime tourist destinations. The charm of Kithnos is just that – the quiet, traditional Greek villages, the intimate tavernas, the hospitality of a warm and inviting people. Sailing in Kithnos waters is a journey to serenity, where the pace of life is slow and the subdued beauty is unforgettable.

Day 4

Kea Island

At the western edge of the Cyclades, you will find the mountainous isle of Kea, its steep slopes carpeted in forests and scrubby brush from the abundant springs and streams, quite rare in the archipelagos fanning out into the Aegean from mainland Greece. As you go sailing in Kea waters, approaching from the Saronic Gulf, the green heights become plain long before you reach the coast. The main port of the island is Korissia. A selection of low-key cafés, tavernas, and restaurants are in the port and the nearby village of Vourkari, as well as a number of shops. Historic sites and religious monuments are fascinating to explore, and the island is also popular for its more than 30 hiking trails that were once part of the ancient road system linking the villages of the island. The beaches are superb. Kea sailing is a rich and varied adventure in an idyllic setting.

Day 5

Cape Sounion Bay

Few places showcase the natural beauty and rich history of Greece quite like Cape Sounion. Perched on the towering cliffs of the Attica Peninsula, the area’s biggest attraction is the legendary Temple of Poseidon. Composed of worn white marble, these restored ruins date all the way back to 440 B.C. when the original temple was built to honor the legendary god of the sea. Look close and you might find the mark of George Lord Byron, a famed romantic poet and frequent visitor to Cape Sounion. Nearby are the ruins of the Temple of Athena, goddess of wisdom.

Overlooking the beautiful Saronic Gulf, the views from the Cape are absolutely stunning. Stay and watch the sunset for a photo-worthy finish to your day.

Day 6

Marina Zea

The Zea Marina is much more than just a place to dock your boat. This 4.7-square-mile facility is the epicenter of everything from coffee shops to bars, cafes, markets and more. Stroll along the waterfront and watch as the sun shimmers off the glistening Bay of Zea. If you’ve got some time, there are also plenty of things to do surrounding city of Piraeus. Get a fascinating glimpse of Grecian history at the Archaeological Museum of Piraeus or the Nautical Museum of Greece; marvel at the massive Church of Saint Nicholas and its beautifully intricate interior; or pull up a chair at a harbor side café and watch as the boats move in and out of the bay.

As you can see, there are plenty of things to do around Zea Marina, but if you’re looking to explore the most famous city in all of Greece, it’s definitely recommended that you take the 10-minute drive into Athens. The birthplace of Western civilization, Athens is now a vibrant and modern city that still preserves much of its important past.

Visiting The Acropolis is an absolute must. Take the short walk up to the ancient high city and explore famous historical structures like the Parthenon, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erectheion and the nearby New Acropolis Museum.

If you’re looking to learn more, head over to Museum Mile, a long strip of museums that starts at Syntagma Square and includes the National Archaeological Museum, home world’s finest collection of art and sculpture from Ancient Greece.

Day 1

Marina Zea

The Zea Marina is much more than just a place to dock your boat. This 4.7-square-mile facility is the epicenter of everything from coffee shops to bars, cafes, markets and more. Stroll along the waterfront and watch as the sun shimmers off the glistening Bay of Zea. If you’ve got some time, there are also plenty of things to do surrounding city of Piraeus. Get a fascinating glimpse of Grecian history at the Archaeological Museum of Piraeus or the Nautical Museum of Greece; marvel at the massive Church of Saint Nicholas and its beautifully intricate interior; or pull up a chair at a harbor side café and watch as the boats move in and out of the bay.

As you can see, there are plenty of things to do around Zea Marina, but if you’re looking to explore the most famous city in all of Greece, it’s definitely recommended that you take the 10-minute drive into Athens. The birthplace of Western civilization, Athens is now a vibrant and modern city that still preserves much of its important past.

Visiting The Acropolis is an absolute must. Take the short walk up to the ancient high city and explore famous historical structures like the Parthenon, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erectheion and the nearby New Acropolis Museum.

If you’re looking to learn more, head over to Museum Mile, a long strip of museums that starts at Syntagma Square and includes the National Archaeological Museum, home world’s finest collection of art and sculpture from Ancient Greece.

Day 2

Cape Sounion Bay

Few places showcase the natural beauty and rich history of Greece quite like Cape Sounion. Perched on the towering cliffs of the Attica Peninsula, the area’s biggest attraction is the legendary Temple of Poseidon. Composed of worn white marble, these restored ruins date all the way back to 440 B.C. when the original temple was built to honor the legendary god of the sea. Look close and you might find the mark of George Lord Byron, a famed romantic poet and frequent visitor to Cape Sounion. Nearby are the ruins of the Temple of Athena, goddess of wisdom.

Overlooking the beautiful Saronic Gulf, the views from the Cape are absolutely stunning. Stay and watch the sunset for a photo-worthy finish to your day.

Day 3

Spetses Island

Located at the mouth of the Argolic Gulf, Spetses is a small island touting a colorful collage of tree-dotted peaks, whitewashed villas and bright blue water as far as the eye can see. Here, you can relax and play on Ayia Paraskevi Beach, which is just as picturesque as it is peaceful. About a half-mile south sits Bekiri Cave, an open-air cavern just off the shore. You can easily swim right into the cave and even stand up on the small beach area inside. For a fascinating glimpse into the island’s history, visit Bouboulina’s Museum and learn the story of Laskarina Bouboulina, a female naval commander who led the fight in Greece’s War for independence back in 1821. The beautiful structure the museum sits inside was actually Bouboulina’s home for much of her life.

Day 4

Navplion

There are plenty of things to do and see in the old town of Nafplio. Walk to the town square and marvel at Vouleftikon, the immense domed building where the first parliament of the Greek nation met in the early 19th century. Across the square, there’s an Archeological Museum housed in another beautiful Venetian building. Here, you can get an up-close glimpse of ancient Greece through a number of ancient artifacts.

There are plenty of attractions outside the city you won’t want to miss either. Follow the signs and head up the hill to the Palamidi Fortress. Built by the Venetians in the early 18th century, this complex structure was designed so well, it was said to be unconquerable—that is, until the Greeks finally succeeded in 1822. If you’re looking to swim and sunbathe, head to the beach of Karathona located just south of the Palamidi Fortress.

Day 5

Poros

Approaching the town, you’ll sail through a narrow, picturesque channel that separates the island of Poros from the Peloponnese peninsula. Pine, olive and lemon trees blanket the hillsides and reach the sandy beaches. You’ll see a mountainous green landscape overlooking the red-topped roofs that line the streets of Poros Town. A host of cafes, bars and souvenir shops line the docks of Poros Town, but the best are located around the town square near the museum and town hall.

Majestic vistas await from the top of the island’s pine-forested interior. Consider hiring a scooter to further explore this area. At the top of the island’s highest hill, you’ll find the historic clock of Poros, a trademark of the island that is visible from everywhere. For a more historical adventure, visit Moni Zoodochou Pigis, an 18th century monastery built around the island’s only spring.

If you’re up for a good party, the most famous nightclub on the island is Poseidon, which is located on a hillside overlooking the town. The party starts at 1 p.m. and continues until the wee morning hours.

Day 6

Epidaurus Town, Mainland

Located in the heart of the Peloponnesian Peninsula, Epidaurus is one of the most significant archaeological sites in all of Greece. Perhaps its most famous attraction, the Epidaurus Theater (or Sanctuary of Asciepius) was built in the 4th century BC with a special feature that still marvels many today. Thanks to its rounded limestone architecture, the theatre boasts some of the most incredible acoustics you’ll ever encounter. Stand in the center of the stage, speak as softly as you can, and listen as even the gentlest whisper echoes off the stands.

There’s also a small museum located near the entrance of the site where you can learn why the ancient Greeks considered this place so miraculous. Another site worth visiting is the Sanctuary of Asklepios, was a sacred center devoted to the god of healing. After touring the sites, you can enjoy lunch at any of numerous cafes throughout the nearby town. Spend an afternoon walking the city streets or relaxing on the adjacent beach before cruising back to Zea for the last voyage of your trip.

Day 7

Marina Zea

The Zea Marina is much more than just a place to dock your boat. This 4.7-square-mile facility is the epicenter of everything from coffee shops to bars, cafes, markets and more. Stroll along the waterfront and watch as the sun shimmers off the glistening Bay of Zea. If you’ve got some time, there are also plenty of things to do surrounding city of Piraeus. Get a fascinating glimpse of Grecian history at the Archaeological Museum of Piraeus or the Nautical Museum of Greece; marvel at the massive Church of Saint Nicholas and its beautifully intricate interior; or pull up a chair at a harbor side café and watch as the boats move in and out of the bay.

As you can see, there are plenty of things to do around Zea Marina, but if you’re looking to explore the most famous city in all of Greece, it’s definitely recommended that you take the 10-minute drive into Athens. The birthplace of Western civilization, Athens is now a vibrant and modern city that still preserves much of its important past.

Visiting The Acropolis is an absolute must. Take the short walk up to the ancient high city and explore famous historical structures like the Parthenon, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erectheion and the nearby New Acropolis Museum.

If you’re looking to learn more, head over to Museum Mile, a long strip of museums that starts at Syntagma Square and includes the National Archaeological Museum, home world’s finest collection of art and sculpture from Ancient Greece.

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