Our Marina Zea cruising itinerary will guide you through some of the most picturesque scenery in Greece. You will be surrounded by beautiful bays and coves across the Saronic Gulf, and neighbouring islands filled with quiet villages, historic sites and scenic beaches that make this cruising ground so unique. A typical Marina Zea itinerary can include the protected waters of the Saronic Gulf between the Attica and Peloponnesian peninsulas. Popular stops include the islands of Kea, Hydra, Poros and Kithnos, to name just a few. Each destination has a pleasing host of rewarding attractions that are certainly worth experiencing: snorkelling, swimming, and sunbathing on pristine beaches; sightseeing tours of ancient temples and medieval castles; exploring traditional open-air markets and dining in intimate tavernas.

Day 1
perdika_greece

Perdika Village, Aegina

Around 10km south of Aeginas main town, you will reach Perdika, a tranquil, traditional fishing village with much exploration to offer.

As you wander through the narrow alleyways and stairs of the village, you will come across exquisite fish tavernas serving up fresh local produce, as well as several cafes, bars and ouzeries. Take a stroll along the cobbled promenade lined with palm trees and benches to sit whilst you admire the view of the Aegean Sea.

Closeby is the uninhabited Moni Island which is an attraction not to be missed, especially for its magnificent swimming and snorkelling and onland wildlife such as goats, peacocks and deer.

Day 2

Poros

Approaching the town, you’ll sail through a narrow, picturesque channel that separates the island of Poros from the Peloponnese peninsula. Pine, olive and lemon trees blanket the hillsides down to the sandy beaches. You’ll see a mountainous green landscape overlooking the red-topped roofs that line the streets of Poros Town. A host of cafes, bars and souvenir shops line the docks of Poros Town, but the best are located around the town square near the museum and town hall.

Majestic vistas await from the top of the island’s pine-forested interior. Consider hiring a scooter to further explore this area. At the top of the island’s highest hill, you’ll find the historic clock of Poros, a trademark of the island that is visible from all around. For a more historical adventure, visit Moni Zoodochou Pigis, an 18th century monastery built around the island’s only spring.

If you’re up for a good party, the most famous nightclub on the island is Poseidon, which is located on a hillside overlooking the town. The party starts at 1.00 p.m. and continues until the wee morning hours.

Day 3

Hydra

Hydra is a distinctively charming “must do” itinerary stop. The welcoming culture, architecture and beautifully tranquil seaside setting of Hydra have long been an attraction for travellers seeking unique experiences off the beaten track. Here, donkeys and walking are the primary means of transportation – cars and even bicycles are not permitted! Hydra is a place where you will truly slip into a most relaxing Mediterranean way of life. The town has a reputation for serving superior Grecian cuisine; it also has picturesque beaches, perfect for swimming, snorkelling and sunbathing, and an intriguing history. Here you’ll see elegant mansions from a bygone era, as well as historic monasteries and museums.

Day 4
Methana Greece

Methana

The peninsula of Methana displays stunning volcanic landscape emerging from the sea, covered in dense vegetation, flora and fauna, as well as picturesque coastal villages. If you are looking for an adventurous and challenging experience, you can take a 25-minute hike up to the lip of the volcano and take in the mysterious surroundings.

When you reach the volcanic peninsula, you will come across a charming fishing village called Agios Georgios. Here, you can enjoy the natural spa with thermal baths or visit the renovated hydrotherapy spa.

Day 5

Epidaurus Town, Mainland

Epidaurus signifies one of the most important ancient sites in Greece, with the towns historical theatre (c. 340-330 B.C.) which is listed as a UNESCO world heritage site. Since the 1950s, every summer there are many performances as part of a festival programme - well worth a visit.

The Epidaurus area also offers beautiful seaside villages with pristine beaches ideal for snorkeling and swimming. Scuba diving is exceptional, where you may discover ancient treasures.

If you would rather explore inland, follow the walking paths lined with ancient ruins, orange and olive groves, or dine at one of the fish tavernas to tantalise the tastebuds.

Day 6

Marina Zea

The Zea Marina is much more than just a place to dock your boat. This 4.7-square-mile facility is the epicentre of everything from coffee shops to bars, cafes, markets and more. Stroll along the waterfront and watch as the sun shimmers off the glistening Bay of Zea. If you’ve got some time, there are also plenty of things to do in the surrounding city of Piraeus. Get a fascinating glimpse of Grecian history at the Archaeological Museum of Piraeus or the Nautical Museum of Greece; marvel at the massive Church of Saint Nicholas and its beautifully intricate interior; or pull up a chair at a harborside café and watch as boats move in and out of the bay.

As you can see, there are plenty of things to do around Zea Marina, but if you’re looking to explore the most famous city in Greece, we definitely recommend that you take the 10-minute drive into Athens. The birthplace of Western civilization, Athens is now a vibrant and modern city that still preserves much of its important past.

Visiting The Acropolis is an absolute must. Take the short walk up to the ancient high city and explore famous historical structures like the Parthenon, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erectheion and the nearby New Acropolis Museum.

If you’re looking to learn more, head over to Museum Mile, a long strip of museums that starts at Syntagma Square and includes the National Archaeological Museum, home of the world’s finest collection of art and sculpture from Ancient Greece.

Day 1

Marina Zea

The Zea Marina is much more than just a place to dock your boat. This 4.7-square-mile facility is the epicentre of everything from coffee shops to bars, cafes, markets and more. Stroll along the waterfront and watch as the sun shimmers off the glistening Bay of Zea. If you’ve got some time, there are also plenty of things to do in the surrounding city of Piraeus. Get a fascinating glimpse of Grecian history at the Archaeological Museum of Piraeus or the Nautical Museum of Greece; marvel at the massive Church of Saint Nicholas and its beautifully intricate interior; or pull up a chair at a harborside café and watch as boats move in and out of the bay.

As you can see, there are plenty of things to do around Zea Marina, but if you’re looking to explore the most famous city in Greece, we definitely recommend that you take the 10-minute drive into Athens. The birthplace of Western civilization, Athens is now a vibrant and modern city that still preserves much of its important past.

Visiting The Acropolis is an absolute must. Take the short walk up to the ancient high city and explore famous historical structures like the Parthenon, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erectheion and the nearby New Acropolis Museum.

If you’re looking to learn more, head over to Museum Mile, a long strip of museums that starts at Syntagma Square and includes the National Archaeological Museum, home of the world’s finest collection of art and sculpture from Ancient Greece.

Day 2

Cape Sounion Bay

Few places showcase the natural beauty and rich history of Greece quite like Cape Sounion. Perched on the towering cliffs of the Attica Peninsula, the area’s biggest attraction is the legendary Temple of Poseidon. Composed of worn white marble, these restored ruins date all the way back to 440 BC when the original temple was built to honour the legendary god of the sea.Take a closer look and you might find the mark of George Lord Byron, the famed romantic poet and once frequent visitor to Cape Sounion. Nearby are the ruins of the Temple of Athena, goddess of wisdom.

Overlooking the beautiful Saronic Gulf, the views from the Cape are absolutely stunning. Stay and watch the sunset for a photo-worthy finish to your day.

Day 3

Spetses Island

Located at the mouth of the Argolic Gulf, Spetses is a small island displaying a colorful collage of tree-dotted peaks and whitewashed villas, with bright blue water stretching to the horizon. On the west coast of the island you can relax and play on Ayia Paraskevi Beach, which is just as picturesque as it is peaceful. Just half a mile to the south you'll find Bekiri Cave, an open-air cavern on the shoreline. You can easily swim right into the cave and even stand up on the small beach area inside. For a fascinating glimpse into the island’s history, visit Bouboulina’s Museum and learn the story of Laskarina Bouboulina, a female naval commander who led the fight in Greece’s War for Independence back in 1821. The museum is housed in a beautiful building that was once Bouboulinas home for much of her life.

Day 4

Navplion

There are plenty of things to see and do in the old town of Nafplio. Walk to the town square and marvel at Vouleftikon, the immense domed building where the first parliament of the Greek nation met in the early 19th century. Across the square, there’s an Archeological Museum housed in another beautiful Venetian building. Here, you can get a close-up glimpse of ancient Greece through a number of ancient artefacts.

There are plenty of attractions outside the city you won’t want to miss either. Follow the signs and head up the hill to the Palamidi Fortress. Built by the Venetians in the early 18th century, this complex structure was so well-designed that it was said to be unconquerable – that is, until the Greeks finally conquered it in 1822. If you’re looking to swim and sunbathe, head to the beach of Karathona located just south of the Palamidi Fortress.

Day 5

Poros

Approaching the town, you’ll sail through a narrow, picturesque channel that separates the island of Poros from the Peloponnese peninsula. Pine, olive and lemon trees blanket the hillsides down to the sandy beaches. You’ll see a mountainous green landscape overlooking the red-topped roofs that line the streets of Poros Town. A host of cafes, bars and souvenir shops line the docks of Poros Town, but the best are located around the town square near the museum and town hall.

Majestic vistas await from the top of the island’s pine-forested interior. Consider hiring a scooter to further explore this area. At the top of the island’s highest hill, you’ll find the historic clock of Poros, a trademark of the island that is visible from all around. For a more historical adventure, visit Moni Zoodochou Pigis, an 18th century monastery built around the island’s only spring.

If you’re up for a good party, the most famous nightclub on the island is Poseidon, which is located on a hillside overlooking the town. The party starts at 1.00 p.m. and continues until the wee morning hours.

Day 6

Epidaurus Town, Mainland

Epidaurus signifies one of the most important ancient sites in Greece, with the towns historical theatre (c. 340-330 B.C.) which is listed as a UNESCO world heritage site. Since the 1950s, every summer there are many performances as part of a festival programme - well worth a visit.

The Epidaurus area also offers beautiful seaside villages with pristine beaches ideal for snorkeling and swimming. Scuba diving is exceptional, where you may discover ancient treasures.

If you would rather explore inland, follow the walking paths lined with ancient ruins, orange and olive groves, or dine at one of the fish tavernas to tantalise the tastebuds.

Day 7

Marina Zea

The Zea Marina is much more than just a place to dock your boat. This 4.7-square-mile facility is the epicentre of everything from coffee shops to bars, cafes, markets and more. Stroll along the waterfront and watch as the sun shimmers off the glistening Bay of Zea. If you’ve got some time, there are also plenty of things to do in the surrounding city of Piraeus. Get a fascinating glimpse of Grecian history at the Archaeological Museum of Piraeus or the Nautical Museum of Greece; marvel at the massive Church of Saint Nicholas and its beautifully intricate interior; or pull up a chair at a harborside café and watch as boats move in and out of the bay.

As you can see, there are plenty of things to do around Zea Marina, but if you’re looking to explore the most famous city in Greece, we definitely recommend that you take the 10-minute drive into Athens. The birthplace of Western civilization, Athens is now a vibrant and modern city that still preserves much of its important past.

Visiting The Acropolis is an absolute must. Take the short walk up to the ancient high city and explore famous historical structures like the Parthenon, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erectheion and the nearby New Acropolis Museum.

If you’re looking to learn more, head over to Museum Mile, a long strip of museums that starts at Syntagma Square and includes the National Archaeological Museum, home of the world’s finest collection of art and sculpture from Ancient Greece.

Day 1

Cape Sounion Bay

Few places showcase the natural beauty and rich history of Greece quite like Cape Sounion. Perched on the towering cliffs of the Attica Peninsula, the area’s biggest attraction is the legendary Temple of Poseidon. Composed of worn white marble, these restored ruins date all the way back to 440 B.C. when the original temple was built to honor the legendary god of the sea. Look close and you might find the mark of George Lord Byron, a famed romantic poet and frequent visitor to Cape Sounion. Nearby are the ruins of the Temple of Athena, goddess of wisdom.

Overlooking the beautiful Saronic Gulf, the views from the Cape are absolutely stunning. Stay and watch the sunset for a photo-worthy finish to your day.

Day 2
Kythnos

Kythnos

Located southeast of Kea and northwest of Serifos, Kythnos is typical of the acrid, rugged islands found throughout the Aegean Sea. Its brown-colored hills extend just over 1,000 feet in height. Along the coast are numerous coves and bays, some of them quite beautiful with nearby sandy beaches. Exploring the indented shores aboard your graceful yacht marks a highpoint of Kythnos sailing. The ambience at the port towns and inland villages is laid-back, far removed from the bustle found on islands that are prime tourist destinations. The charm of Kythnos is just that – the quiet, traditional Greek villages, the intimate tavernas, the hospitality of a warm and inviting people. Sailing in Kythnos waters is a journey to serenity, where the pace of life is slow and the subdued beauty is unforgettable.

Day 3
Serifos

Serifos

One of the hidden gems of the Cyclades is Serifos, which combines rugged, natural landscape with impressive white-washed cubed architecture. The capital, Chora is built on a steep mountain with narrow alleyways, bougainvillea-filled courtyards, colorful houses and stunning Aegean sea views. Walk up the stairway to the Venetian castle that includes the chapels of Agia Varvara, the Saviour, Agios Konstandinos and Agios Ioannis.

On the southeastern side of Serifos is the quaint port of Livadi, which is the tourist centre with an abundance of bars and restaurants. You will also find beautiful beaches such as Megalo Livadi, Aghios Sostis, Psili Ammos, Aghios Ioannis, Koutalas and Sikamia. West of Koutalas beach is the famous limestone Cave of Koutalas, with impressive stalactites and stalagmites. On a rust-coloured hillside above Megalo Livadi beach is the mining museum, where you can learn about Serifos past and main source of income. The hill is lined with old rail tracks, wagons and tunnels.

Day 4
Sifnos

Sifnos

Cosmopolitan Sifnos is renowned for its rich culinery heritage, local crafts, traditional architecture and beautiful beaches. Once a gold and mining location, it has since developed a reputation for offering the finer things in life. Despite this sense of luxury, Sifnos has kept its low profile, providing a peaceful, relaxing atmosphere for all visitors to enjoy.

Sifnos main town, Apollonia is the place to go for entertainment, including locally organised festivals with lively music and delicious food. Be sure to indulge in the traditional cuisine consisting of chickpea soup, mastelo (lamb or goat baked on vine branches) and salad with capers.

 

Day 5
Milos

Milos

Shaped by its volcanic past, Milos is an extordinary island with the most exotic landscape and incredible beaches, scattered with red, pink and orange volcanic rocks. Sarakiniko and Kleftiko beaches present impressive white rock formations with eroded caves and emerald waters.

Stroll around the charming, colourful Little Venice, where the ancient port of Milos used to be, and catch the sunset. Or head towards the east of the island where you can discover the eerie atmosphere of the old sulphur mine with old train tracks, carriages and iron bridges.

Day 6
Ios, Cyclades Itinerary

Ios

Ios is famous for its lively party scene, however it offers so much more than this, from the magnificent views, to the breathtaking landscape and clifftop villages. Get lost in the cobblestoned alleyways of the capital, Chora and climb up to the Odysseas Elytis Theatre, which resembles ancient Greek theatres and is the perfect spot for sea views. Worth a visit is Skarkos Hill, the island’s largest, award winning Bronze Age archaeological excavation site.

If you would prefer to be amongst the vibrant atmosphere, visit Mylopotas beach, a 1km long sandy beach with Far Out Club based at the end.

Day 7
Small Cyclades

Small Cyclades (DHENOUSSA - IRAKLIA – SKHINOUSA – KOUFONISIA)

The Small Cyclades, a group of 32 islands and islets are considered the true hidden gems of the Cyclades. Today, only four islands remain inhabited - Iraklia, Schinousa, Koufonisia and Dhenoussa.

Iraklia is the largest of the islands and home to the Cave of the Sacred Icon of Agios Giannis, about 2 hours walk from the main port. Koufonisia is the go-to fashionable destination of the Small Cyclades where the Old Town is lined with cafes and restaurants. Dhenoussa sits apart and offers a more secluded, peaceful experience.

Day 8
Paros, Cyclades Itinerary

Paros

In the heart of the Aegean Sea is Paros, which combines traditional elements such as the architecture, quaint villages and historical monuments with the lively nightlife and bustling beaches. Paros stretches across 120km of coastline and has endless blonde-sand beaches at the bottom of lush mountains, perfect for kitesurfing and windsurfing.

Head to the capital and cultural hub, Paroikia and immerse yourself in the buzz of the sophisticated bars, restaurants and tavernas. Or explore Paros Environmental and Cultural Park, which is approximately 80 hectares of walking trails,remarkable rock formations, caves and hidden coves.

Day 9
Mykonos

Mykonos

Widely known as the 'Ibiza of Greece', you can expect a vivid party scene, award-winning restaurants, lively bars, designer boutiques and incredible beaches. The trademark of Mykonos is the windmills in front of Little Venice, an 18th centure district which is the most picturesque part of the main town and the perfect spot to watch the sunset.

The dry, windy climate of Mykonos attracts watersports enthusiasts who enjoy surfing, windsurfing and kitesurfing on the many beautiful beaches. One of the main attractions of the Cyclades is the sacred islet of Delos, which was the island of God Apollo and is considered one of the most important archealogical sites in Greece.

Day 10
Syros

Syros

Whilst there is so much to do in Syros, it is the quieter, calmer island of the Cyclades. The classy capital Ermoupoli is stately and grand with marble paved squares, neoclassical buildings, and catholic and orthodox churches. Vaporia is the attractive area of Ermoupoli, where glamorous receptions and lavish balls were held in the numerous Venetian mansions.

In the southern part of Syros, you will find the most popular beaches - Kini, Galissa, Delfini, and Dellagratsia. Or you can head north to Grammata and the Grey Cave with inscribes of wishes and prayers covering the rocks dating back to Roman and Byzantine times.

Day 11
Kythnos

Kythnos

Located southeast of Kea and northwest of Serifos, Kythnos is typical of the acrid, rugged islands found throughout the Aegean Sea. Its brown-colored hills extend just over 1,000 feet in height. Along the coast are numerous coves and bays, some of them quite beautiful with nearby sandy beaches. Exploring the indented shores aboard your graceful yacht marks a highpoint of Kythnos sailing. The ambience at the port towns and inland villages is laid-back, far removed from the bustle found on islands that are prime tourist destinations. The charm of Kythnos is just that – the quiet, traditional Greek villages, the intimate tavernas, the hospitality of a warm and inviting people. Sailing in Kythnos waters is a journey to serenity, where the pace of life is slow and the subdued beauty is unforgettable.

Day 12
Kea

Kea Island

At the western edge of the Cyclades, you will find the mountainous isle of Kea, its steep slopes carpeted in forests and scrubby brush from the abundant springs and streams, quite rare in the archipelagos fanning out into the Aegean from mainland Greece. As you go sailing in Kea waters, approaching from the Saronic Gulf, the green heights become plain long before you reach the coast. The main port of the island is Korissia. A selection of low-key cafés, tavernas, and restaurants are in the port and the nearby village of Vourkari, as well as a number of shops. Historic sites and religious monuments are fascinating to explore, and the island is also popular for its more than 30 hiking trails that were once part of the ancient road system linking the villages of the island. The beaches are superb. Kea sailing is a rich and varied adventure in an idyllic setting.

Day 13

Marina Zea

The Zea Marina is much more than just a place to dock your boat. This 4.7-square-mile facility is the epicenter of everything from coffee shops to bars, cafes, markets and more. Stroll along the waterfront and watch as the sun shimmers off the glistening Bay of Zea. If you’ve got some time, there are also plenty of things to do surrounding city of Piraeus. Get a fascinating glimpse of Grecian history at the Archaeological Museum of Piraeus or the Nautical Museum of Greece; marvel at the massive Church of Saint Nicholas and its beautifully intricate interior; or pull up a chair at a harbor side café and watch as the boats move in and out of the bay.

As you can see, there are plenty of things to do around Zea Marina, but if you’re looking to explore the most famous city in all of Greece, it’s definitely recommended that you take the 10-minute drive into Athens. The birthplace of Western civilization, Athens is now a vibrant and modern city that still preserves much of its important past.

Visiting The Acropolis is an absolute must. Take the short walk up to the ancient high city and explore famous historical structures like the Parthenon, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erectheion and the nearby New Acropolis Museum.

If you’re looking to learn more, head over to Museum Mile, a long strip of museums that starts at Syntagma Square and includes the National Archaeological Museum, home world’s finest collection of art and sculpture from Ancient Greece.

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